Crickets in Arizona

Several kinds of crickets are found in Arizona. Although they pose no immediate health risks (they do not bite or carry disease) they have been known to eat through everything from wallpaper glue to wool to silk. Most importantly, if you are seeing crickets inside your Arizona home then they will be sure to attract hungry spiders and scorpions.

What are crickets?

Adult crickets have antennae and are about one inch long. They are easily distinguished from other insects by their large hind legs which are modified for jumping. Depending on the species, their bodies are light brown to black in color. Their front wings vary in length, covering anywhere from half to their entire abdomen and some species may not have wings. Newly hcricketatched crickets look like miniature, winged versions of their parents and feed on the same types of food. After several molts they gain adult characteristics and begin producing the next generation.

Crickets feed on decaying plant material, fungi, and seedling plants. Crickets benefit their surrounding environment by breaking down plant material and renewing soil minerals. They are also an important source of food for other animals like spiders, some wasps, ground beetles, birds, small rodents, and lizards.

Chirping

Crickets can be considered a nuisance particularly in large numbers because of their “chirping.” To attract mates, male crickets produce a chirping noise made by rubbing their front wings against each other. The chirping sound is picked up by the female’s ears and can be quite loud. Chirp sounds are specific to different species. Although some people may enjoy this sound, it can become a serious nuisance if it continues for a long period of time or if you are trying to get some sleep.

FUN FACT: The song of the field cricket is temperature dependent. The tone and tempo drop with a drop in temperature. Count the chirps in 13 seconds, add 40, and you will have the approximate temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.

Where do They Live?

Crickets are primarily active at night and spend the days hidden in moist, cool shady spots near ground level. In nature, you can find crickets in leaf litter under rocks and logs in fields, gardens, and along roadsides. Around your home, they prefer to live in voids, like under those decorative boulders in your yard, meter boxes, or under the sidewalk and patio. Crickets love stacked firewood, eroded expansion joints, piles of rock, or other shady cover at ground level. You will likely find crickets around your home’s foundation, especially in the gap between the stem wall and the stucco. More than 1,000 crickets can cram into one tiny nest.

Cricket Control Measures

There is no single, perfect solution for the control of crickets. By removing places crickets like to hide, you can dramatically reduce the number trying to invade your home. Crickets entering your home are typically looking for food or trying to find more comfortable temperatures. Prevention is the easiest way to manage cricket populations.

  • Insect-proof your home to prevent these chirping pests from getting inside in the first place, particularly at or near ground level.
  • Use calking and weather stripping to seal all cracks, gaps, and openings in foundations, siding, windows, doors, screens, and other possible entry points (e.g.,  around plumbing and electrical connections). Sealing gaps in the foundation wall itself also will stop scorpions and other pests from coming indoors.
  • Make sure all doors (including screen and garage doors) are closed and tight-fitting.
  • Keep lights off at night as much as possible. Crickets are attracted to lights. If you light your house at night with strong lamps, you might be luring them toward your house.
  • Crickets build their nests in tall grasses and other vegetation so remove vegetation and debris that could serve as a hiding place or breeding site. Trim back your plants and keep your lawn mowed.
  • Eliminate food and water sources. Be sure to put pet food away and keep your kitchen clean.
  • Encourage the presence of natural predators like cats, lizards, birds, and non-venomous spiders.

A professional pest control company can implement an integrated pest management solution to make nesting sites inhospitable and significantly reduce the number of crickets gaining entry into your home. A trained professional can provide you with preventive treatments on a regular basis and will find the pests before they take over your home. Call your trained Truly Nolen pest removal expert to discuss options for cricket removal at your home.

Back to School Pesky Critters

By Scott Svenheim, ACE
Spokesperson and Associate Certified Entomologist, Truly Nolen of America 

With the back-to-school season nearing, parents have already started to think about preparing their kids – and how can anyone forget that the start of school is looming with commercials already airing!

With pesky critters like bed bugs, head lice and mosquitoes becoming more prevalent in our communities, parents need to take the necessary precautions to avoid infecting their homes.

back-to-school

Bed bugs are nocturnal and have the capabilities to climb softer surfaces such as that duffle bag you sent your children to camp with. Here are some tips to avoid allowing a possible bed bug infestation in your home:

  • Leave luggage outside, in a garage or a secluded area away from other soft materials where they can’t find a way to transfer to another item in your home.
  • Wash and/or Dry possibly infected clothing separately and with hot water, or medium temperature at least 20 minutes.

Head lice is one itchy problem and another pest that can easily hop from one head of hair to another. When your child arrives back from camp, make sure to conduct a thorough screening of his/her scalp with a fine-tooth comb. Many convenience stores will have specialty combs available for purchase. Signs your child may have head lice include:

  • Scratching
  • Small red bumps or sores from scratching
  • Adult lice or eggs on hair strands

Mosquito bites are one of the most common and with viruses like Chikungunya spreading quickly through the United States every bump and bite is worth inspecting. Check any suspicious bumps and circle them with a marker – this will allow you to monitor the bite to ensure it doesn’t get any larger, red or swollen.

If bed bugs or other pests become a bigger issue in your home, call your local pest control company who will be able to assess the level of infestation and recommend necessary courses of treatment.


About Scott Svenheim and Truly Nolen
Scott Svenheim, an expert for Truly Nolen of America and Associate Certified Entomologist, has 27 years of experience in the pest control industry.  Scott brings an informative as well as unique and entertaining perspective to consumers’ pest problems in the 21st century. Founded in 1938, Tucson, Arizona-based Truly Nolen of America is the largest family owned pest control company in the United States. Truly Nolen has over 80 branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, Puerto Rico and 60 countries. For more information, please visit www.trulynolen.com.

Fire Ants in Texas

Truly Nolen - Fire Ants in TexasWith the recent rains in Texas, many residents are seeing the emergence of fire ant mounds in their lawns and in fields. These aggressive ants cause harm and damage to people, plants, and animals in both urban and rural areas – according to Texas A&M University researchers it is estimated fire ants cost Texans $1.2 billion annually in property damage and control costs, with residential households making up 50% of the total expense incurred.

What Are Fire Ants?

“Fire ant” is a general name referring to six different species of ants, five of which are found in Texas. Since they all cause damage and harm to humans and animals, there is generally little need for the homeowner to tell them apart. To the naked eye, fire ants resemble ordinary ants. They are very small (average 1/8 to 1/4 inch in length) and are reddish brown to black in color.

They are very aggressive, attacking anytime their mound is disturbed. Fire ants can be dangerous to small animals and humans because of the toxin released from the sting.

Where Are Fire Ants Found?

This biting ant is most commonly found in the southeastern United States including the eastern two-thirds of Texas. Fire ants live in colonies and build mound-shaped nests favoring open, sunny areas. Mature colonies appear as fluffy worked soil and can contain more than 200,000 ants. Fire ant mounds look different from other ant mounds since they do not have a visible opening in the center. Instead, fire ants come and go through an extensive network of underground tunnels.

Undisturbed mounds in rural areas can grow up to 18 inches tall but most are only a few inches. Mounds are often built next to sidewalks, roads, or anywhere fire ants can find food or water – around flowerbeds, landscaped areas, parks, playgrounds, sports fields, and tree trunks or roots.

Even though they are present year-round in Texas, fire ant colonies become more visible after rainfall or heavy irrigation, because the ants are trying to move out of the flooded soil. They are sensitive to temperature and humidity. When the weather gets hot and dry, they tunnel deep into the soil – some as deep as 4 feet – to find cooler temperatures and water. The ant colony seemingly disappears.

FUN FACT: Although fire ants can be extremely dangerous, they are also a very interesting species. Fire ants are social insects that work together in order to survive harsh conditions. During instances in which their homes are threatened by water, fire ants form a raft using their own bodies to reach dry land and keep their queen safe from harm. The colony of fire ants continually take turns being above and below the water level in order to help each ant breathe and remain alive. This adaptation and others like it enable the fire ant species to be tremendously resilient.

Why Are They So Bad?

Truly Nolen - Fire Ant Info TexasFire ants are very aggressive and if their mound is disturbed in any way, worker ants will rush out in large numbers to protect the colony from harm. They will climb up nearby grass and vertical surfaces and attack the person, animal, or thing that disturbed their nest by biting and stinging aggressively and repeatedly. Each ant firmly grasps skin with its jaws and stings many times. Fire ants can pivot at the head and inflict more stings in a circular pattern.

As they bite, fire ants inject a toxin that stings, causing a strong burning, fire-like sensation (hence the name “fire ant”). The sting swells into a bump that can cause a great deal of pain or irritation often with localized swelling. Within 24 to 48 hours, a small itchy pustule (a small, firm blister-like sore) forms around the bite site. Excessive scratching can open the pustules, possibly leading to secondary infection.

The toxin is not deadly for most people, although some are very allergic. The elderly, very young, sick, or those with compromised immune systems may be more affected by the toxin. It is always a good idea to seek medical advice if you believe you have been stung or bitten by a fire ant.

How Can I Avoid Fire Ants?

Although it is impossible to completely eliminate the fire ant population in Texas, you can avoid contact with them and prevent getting stung.

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Be sure to regularly look for fire ant mounds around your property. Do not stand on or near nests or areas where they are foraging.
  • Watch your step. Pay attention to where you’re standing. Serious incidents occur when a person unknowingly allows several fire ants to get on them, usually when they stand on a mound for more than a few seconds without realizing it.
  • Wear protective clothing. Wear boots and/or tuck pant legs into socks to reduce the risk of a bite.

What Do I Do If I Find A Fire Ant Mound In My Yard?

Truly Nolen - Fire Ant Mounds in TexasA possible preventative measure is long residual contact insecticide treatments. Your local pest control expert will apply an insecticide to the lawn surface in order to prevent fire ants from settling into the area. Although there are several self-help methods to eliminating fire ant colonies, it is best to contact your local pest control expert in order to eliminate the infestation safely.

What Do I Do If I Get Fire Ants On Me?

  • First of all remain calm and do NOT panic.
  • Leave the area immediately while quickly brushing the fire ants off using a gloved hand or a cloth. The most effective way to remove fire ants from the skin is with a fast, repetitive brushing motion. Remove the ants that climb up on your body as quickly as possible.
  • Quickly strip off shoes, socks, and clothing where the fire ants are stinging you. Shake out the clothing and inspect every fold before put¬ting them back on.
  • Do not try to shake them off – fire ants hold on tightly with their jaws so they will not just fall off. Do not try to rinse them off with water – it just makes them hold on and sting in another spot.

What Do I Do If I Get Stung?

People vary greatly in their reactions to fire ant stings. Most people just suffer a burning sensation, itching, and pustules with no lasting effects. Those who may be sensitive to fire ant venom may see the sting area become slightly swollen.

  • Ease the burning and itching by using ice, cold compresses, or painkiller sprays and ointments such as over-the-counter antihistamine products.
  •  Treat the pustules, whether intact or open, like any other small wound. Keep it clean.

Watch for problems if a person is stung more than a few times or has an impaired immune system due to a medical condition (e.g., heart condition, diabetes, etc.). The important thing is to watch for severe reactions. Although rare, seek emergency medical attention immediately if you experience any of the following as it could be a sign of a life-threatening allergic reaction:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Faintness or dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Chest pain
  • Tightness in chest or throat
  • Hives or rashes
  • Serious swelling
  • Nausea
  • Severe sweating
  • Slurred speech
  • Shock
  • Coma

Like many pests, fire ants are a fact of life in Texas. Being aware is the best way to stay safe.

Sierra Vista branch named Biz of the Week by Real Estate Press

Congratulations to Christopher Slaper and the Sierra Vista branch being named Biz of the Week by Real Estate Press. Thank you Slaper for being a huge contribution to Truly Nolen’s 76-year history!

Branch manager, Christopher Slaper, has worked with Truly Nolen for about four and half years but has been in the industry for over 30 years. Slaper started his career in New Orleans in 1983 working for the government and has since become an expert in pest control.

The Sierra Vista branch is located on Myer Drive and covers over 50,000 square miles of Arizona territory across five counties including Cochise, Graham and Greenlee counties. Call them at 520-458-5095 and tell them congrats. Visit their webpage.