Identifying Common Types of Bees in Arizona

IDENTIFYING COMMON TYPES OF BEES IN ARIZONA
Arizona is home to many types of bees. There are about 20,000 different species of bees in the world. With the exception of Antarctica, bees are found throughout the world. The greatest diversity of bee species is found in warm, arid or semiarid areas, like the Southwest.

Bees play an important role in nature pollinating plants and wildflowers as well as providing wax and honey. Bees are dependent on pollen as an important protein source and on flower nectar or oils as an energy source. Most bees will not sting unless they feel threatened. Social bees, such as honey bees, are the most common type in Arizona and will typically sting in order to protect their colonies or babies.

HONEY BEES

Closeup of an American Honey Bee

Although some types of bees may be solitary, the honey bee is a social insect and populates in colonies or hives. These hive colonies have a three-tier caste system consisting of: the single queen bee whose only job is to lay eggs; male drones that mate with the queen and die soon thereafter; and female worker bees that don’t reproduce. However the worker bees perform many jobs necessary for the survival of the hive; they clean the hive, collect pollen and nectar to feed the colony, and they take care of the offspring. Their wax hives are perennial and can harbor up to 80,000 bees at once. The average lifespan of a honey bee queen is two to three years – considerably longer than the six weeks of a female worker bee.

Honey bees are the most active in summer months; during winter, bees gather within the hive and self-regulate the internal temperature to keep warm. Honey bees also have specialized feathery body hairs that help collect pollen. They are the most important pollinating insects, and their interdependence with plants is mutually beneficial. While foraging, bees inadvertently transfer pollen from flower to flower resulting in cross-pollination. Honey bees are vital in agriculture as pollinators and they account for 80% of all insect pollination. Each year, bees pollinate an estimated $10 billion of crops in the United States alone. And some estimate that these insect pollinators contribute to one-third of the world’s diet. In addition to being important pollinators, honey bees have an organ that converts flower nectar into honey, which is collected inside the hive or bee colony.

AFRICANIZED HONEY BEES (AHB)

Africanized Honey Bees (AHB) are distantly related to the common domestic European honey bee. This bee, first brought from Africa to Brazil in the mid-1950s in hopes of breeding a bee better adapted to the South American climate, escaped into the wild and its descendants have been moving slowly north toward the US ever since. The first AHB colonies arrived in southern Arizona in the early summer of 1993. They are becoming more prevalent in the Southwest and can now be found in most of Texas, almost half of New Mexico, throughout Arizona, the majority of New Mexico, and portions of California as they continue their migration northward.

Truly Nolen Bee Removal

The “Africanized” honey bee – melodramatically labeled “killer bees” – is a hybrid between domesticated European honey bees and African honey bees. Compared to European bees, the AHB are more likely to sense a threat at greater distances, become more upset with less provocation, and sting a greater number of times, although individual stings from the AHB are not more powerful or painful. AHBs defend their hives very attentively. But away from the hive, they are no more aggressive than other bees or wasps. With their hairy bodies, yellowish-orange abdomens with black bands, to the untrained eye the AHB looks very similar to the honey bee. Only a trained entomologist, using sophisticated laboratory equipment, can tell them apart via a precise measurement or genetic testing.

IDENTIFYING A BEE HIVE

Bees are all around us most of the year in Arizona and typically forage around flowers and water. Foraging bees may sting if they are disturbed accidentally or intentionally. They may also become defensive if they are foraging close to the colony. Avoid close contact with them, and they will go about their nectar-gathering without a second thought to the humans around.

A Hive of American Honey Bees

Just like their mild-mannered relative the domestic honey bees, the Africanized honey bees establish colonies of up to 40,000 individual bees. Both types of bees will swarm, a process where the swarm forms a visible cluster of many bees that is on the move (hundreds to thousands). The queen sets out to find a new location for the hive, some of her worker bees come along with her. They will temporary stop-over to allow the queen to rest but will eventually produce new colonies. Don’t panic – most honeybee swarms are not dangerous if you leave them well alone and keep your distance.

AHB colonies have faster growth rates, which means more swarms splitting off from a nest. Each Africanized honeybee colony typically swarms four to eight times annually compared to an annual rate of less than one swarm per five colonies for European honeybees. They will not however form large swarms and hunt for you as suggested in some movies. If you encounter an AHB swarm, never dive underwater, the swarm will simply wait for you to surface stinging your head and face when you surface. If you are being chased, run in a straight line – AHBs are slow fliers and most people can out run them. Treat honey bee colonies as you would a venomous creature such as a snake or a scorpion; be alert and stay away.

Honey bees are social creatures that create large communal hives with nesting galleries and large honeycombs. AHBs are not specific about the location of their hives, making it likely for them to come into contact with humans. Bees who are working to establish a colony can be seen actively entering and exiting small holes/voids in hollow tree trunks, walls, junk piles, pots, eaves, roofs, or similar location.

REMOVING A BEE HIVE

Never attempt to remove a hive on your own. Be careful and remain calm. If you think you may have a bee infestation, you must first call an expert to determine whether you’re actually dealing with bees and not some other stinging insect. Wasps, hornets, and yellow jackets are sometimes mistaken for bees. Bees are commercially valuable and an important part of our ecosystem, but in the wrong place at the wrong time, they can become pest. The sooner a hive can be identified, the safer and cheaper it can be to have removed as established colonies can be extremely protective of the hive.

Homeowners should immediately contact a pest control company and take special precautions to avoid agitating bees to prevent being stung. Do not try to remove a colony yourself.

Professional Bee Hive RemovalA professional hive removal will focus on removing the queen bee from the hive. If the queen is not removed from the hive bees will continue to return. Relocation of the hive must also be considered in concert with a commercial bee expert for agricultural reasons. If the hive can’t be relocated safely treatments to remove the hive will be conducted. Your bee control professional will apply treatments on the exterior of the hive working inward to kill the bees and properly bag and dispose of the hive. When the hive is removed it is knocked down within an enclosed area and material is forced into the void and within the combs to ensure all bees are dead and removed. Though their venom is no more or less toxic, the AHB tends to sting in greater numbers and is more easily provoked than the European honey bee. Keep pets and children well away from any suspected nesting sites until you get a professional inspection.

WHAT TO DO IF STUNG BY A HONEY BEE

People can all react to honey bee stings differently. Generally, however honey bee stings do not pose a health concern unless an individual is allergic or sensitive. If the stung person is allergic, go to the hospital immediately or use an epinephrine shot, if available. Most importantly, stay calm. And if possible, get to a cool indoor location. If you are stung and can’t find shelter indoors, avoid running near other people. Once you have been stung a chemical called a pheromone signals to other bees that you are a threat inviting other defensive bees to sting.

In general, bees tend to sting people or animals when they feel threatened. Remember that your pets can also be vulnerable to bee stings and keep them away from bee hives. While yellow jackets, hornets and wasps tend to sting repeatedly during an attack, worker bees are equipped with barbed stingers that have little barbs or hooks on them and typically become lodged in the skin. When a bee stings, its stinger, the venom sac attached to the stinger, and other parts of the honey bee’s body rip away from the insect’s body and are left behind, killing the bee. Although the bee dies, its sting takes effect quickly, and, if the stinger is not removed quickly, the symptoms gradually increase as the venom sac continues to pump venom into the wound for several seconds. So if you are stung, it is important to remove the stinger and poison sac as quickly as possible. Do not pull them out with tweezers or your fingers as this will only squeeze more venom into the wound. Scrape them out using your fingernails, the edge of a credit card or a dull knife.

After removing the stinger, it is important to immediately clean the area with soap and cold water and to use cold compression like an ice pack. It is also helpful to elevate the limb where you were stung. Over the counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can also help to reduce the pain. An antihistamine and hydrocortisone ointment can help calm the local reaction. In case the local reaction worsens, your doctor may prescribe an oral steroid or antihistamine to help calm the swelling or itching.

SYMPTOMS OF A BEE ALLERGY

The symptoms that result from a sting vary, depending on the amount of poison that has entered the victim’s system. Typically, people who get stung will immediately feel a sharp, burning pain, rapidly followed by a red welt at the sting site, with a small, white spot at the center marking where the stinger punctured the skin. In most cases, the swelling and pain resolves within a few hours, however, as many as 10 percent of individuals develop a large local reaction experiencing exaggerated redness and swelling at the sting site.

Although a bee sting is not commonly hazardous, some people may be allergic to the bee’s venom. Those who have sensitivity to bees should immediately seek out emergency medical assistance or call 9-1-1 if they experience symptoms of an allergic reaction. In rare cases, individuals experience an extreme allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis. These reactions may be life threatening and require immediate medical treatment. Seek immediate medical attention if you exhibit any of the following symptoms:

  • Itching and swelling around the eyes
  • Tongue and throat swelling
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Dry cough
  • Wheezing or difficulty breathing
  • Hives, rashes, or generalized itching
  • Rapid or weak pulse
  • Drop in blood pressure
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Shortness of breath
  • Shock or loss of consciousness

If you are stung multiple times or experience any of the above symptoms, even if you don’t have a sensitivity, you should seek medical attention as a precaution. If you come in contact with an Africanized honey bee, the most important thing to do is not panic. Most deaths related to bee stings happen because people panic and act irrational. Each year, stinging insects send approximately half a million people to the emergency room and are the leading cause of anaphylaxis-related deaths in the United States.

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Florida Summer Pest Guide

truly-nolen-florida-summer-pest-guide Florida’s summer weather creates an ideal paradise for bugs. The increased temperatures, rain, and humidity lead to an increase in insect activity – including your lawn and in your home. Checking your home and lawn is key to maintaining a pest-free environment.

Lawn

Florida homeowners often spend a great deal of time and energy keeping their lawns lush and green all year long. However, even the most beautifully manicured lawn can have pests hiding in the grass. Recognizing problems before they get out of control is key to keeping your yard healthy and beautiful.

Tips for a Healthy Green Florida Lawn What can I do to protect my Florida lawn from pests this summer? Your Florida lawn requires particular attention during the summer to ensure the proper nutritional balance and to control both the weeds and insect intrusion.  Stressed grass is more susceptible to pests and diseases than healthy grass. You can reduce your chances of insect infestation by mowing frequently but leaving your grass a bit higher (at least three inches to enhance the deep rooting process), use fertilizers sparingly, and avoid watering too often. When summer rains are frequent, you may need to reduce your watering schedule to keep the grass from becoming overly saturated.  

Common Lawn Pests Found In Florida If your yard shows signs of damage, it is important to identify the problem before taking the appropriate steps to treating it. It is essential to monitor your lawn and grass weekly throughout the summer for signs of insects. Some common summer insects are listed below:

Fire Ants

Fire ants are small, aggressive ants that live throughout Florida. They have dull red bodies and are relatively small in size. Fire ants interfere with outdoor activities and can harm wildlife and your pets. In Florida, fire ants are commonly found in open fields and lawns, preferring to nest in dry, flat, and sunny locations. They build rounded dome-like nests or mounds that can be as large as 3 feet wide and high.   These mounds can damage mowing, harvesting, or electrical equipment. Typically they build their nest mounds in the ground near landscaped areas or structural foundations, as they prefer loose earth for mound construction. Ant mounds are unsightly and may reduce land values. Fire ants are least active during the hottest hours of the day. During the cooler part of the day they are very active and aggressive, they will repeatedly sting any intruding animal or person. They avoid darkness and shade, yet are incredibly resilient. If mounds remain undisturbed and the colony rapidly multiplies, fire ants may send additional queens to begin new mounds nearby. Large colonies can have up to 250,000 workers. These ants leave the colony in a massive mating flight. Keep an eye out for heavy ant trails around the walls, driveways, windows, fences, and throughout the yard.

Whiteflies

Whiteflies are a severe problem that is facing Florida homeowners. These creatures develop rapidly in warm weather, making Florida summer an ideal time for infestation. Whiteflies get their name from a white, waxy substance that covers the wings and bodies of adult flies. The adult whitefly is very small – less than 1/16” long – and resembles a tiny moth. There are more than 75 types of whiteflies in Florida. Whiteflies can seriously damage host plants. The flies lay their eggs on the undersides of leaves, where the eggs hatch. Whiteflies feed by sucking the sap from leaves with their needle-like mouths. Both whiteflies and their nymphs pose a threat to plant life, as all stages feed on plant juices. As the whitefly drains off the plant’s juices the leaves dry out, turn yellow, and eventually drop from the plant. Whiteflies congregate in such large numbers, they are able to effectively drain off the plant’s source of water and nutrients, quickly damaging the host plant causing yellowing, stunted growth, wilting, leaf drop, and even plant death. Be careful, because leaves play host to eggs and other life stages of the insects, it is important that you do not allow any damage trimmed from an infested plant to come in contact with other plants because this can spread to the infestation.

Plants affected by the whitefly:  The whitefly has a wide range of host plants, though different whitefly strains prefer certain plants over others. In all, over 500 plant species are affected by the whitefly. This list continues to grow as the whiteflies spread. Fruit and edible plants such as avocado, banana, citrus, mango, guava, plantain, squash, tomatoes, and others are typically affected. Several species of palm trees including King palm, coconut palm, sabal palm and other less common palms can also be affected. Some of the affected ornamental plants include azaleas, bird of paradise, gumbo limbo, bird of paradise, black olive, bougainvillea, buttonwood, fig (ficus), live oak, mahogany, hibiscus, poinsettia, sea grapes, lantana, live oak, wax myrtle and many annuals. Plant damage:  Whiteflies cause visible landscape damage to trees, plants and shrubs. The most noticeable sign of a whitefly infestation are white spirals, combined with a build-up of white, waxy substance on bottom of the leaves. Often times, the build up is so great that plants are actually covered and can lose all their leaves.  These stressed and weakened plants may fall victim to other insects & diseases at this point.

Other damage:  Whiteflies produce an extremely significant amount of “honeydew,” a sticky, sugary honeydew excretion which causes the growth of an ugly sooty mold – a black fungus that grows on the insect’s excrement.  This “honeydew” is the cause for many problems, as it sticks to vehicles, sidewalks and driveways, outdoor furniture, homes, etc. causing damage to car paint and leaving a sticky mess. The honeydew also attracts ants that drive off the natural predators of whiteflies. Control and prevention:

Be sure to check your plants daily for any sign of infestation. Check the undersides of leaves for whitefly eggs or larvae, as this is a good indicator of whitefly presence. If any evidence is found, take action immediately. The best course of action is to call a professional pest control that specializes in using a broad-spectrum insecticide that treats and removes whiteflies. These pests will not leave on their own; they are best treated by a professional and treated quickly.

Chinch Bugs Chinch bugs have black bodies, silvery wings, and antennas and are one of the most common yet damaging pests. Sucking plant juices from infested grass, these pests injure your lawn and can cause large yellow or brown patches to appear. Typically, most chinch bug damage occurs along driveways and sidewalks but can sometimes be found in open sunny areas in the middle of the lawn. One way to keep chinch bugs under control is to water the lawn infrequently yet deeply.

Chinch bugs can cause extensive damage on your lawn if infestations are heavy, so it is often necessary to seek professional help to eliminate them.

Grubs and Common Worms White grubs are the larvae of beetles and rest in a C-shaped position. Grubs and worms damage turf grass by feeding on the roots. Injured grasses will have uneven notches chewed along the sides of the blades. The first signs of infestation resemble drought conditions. Grubs can kill small plants and gnaw cavities in root vegetables. Heavy infestations of grubs attract other pests like raccoons, opossums, crows, ibis, and other birds, which make holes in the lawn and garden to feed on the grubs. Professional lawn spraying is the best solution. A lawn care professional will exterminate the larvae and eggs to prevent further damage.

Other Bugs

You may notice insects swarming (flying) in and around your yard. Insects spread and mate this way. Fleas are also very common at this time of year. The most common flea problem we encounter is with the Cat flea. They breed in sand and dirt, and the hotter it gets outside the worse a cat flea problem can become. When a pest professional treats your lawn for some of these common pests, it also controls fleas and ticks in your yard as well.

INSIDE YOUR FLORIDA HOME

The summer rains and hot temperatures also make it easy for prolific foliage growth. As your plants grow out and touch the side of your house, ants and other pests are able to use the tree limbs as a bridge to your home. Trim tree limbs and foliage away from the house to reduce the chance of these pests getting inside. Yard debris should be bagged and properly disposed of to decrease harborage areas for insects. Insects need shelter, moisture and food. Your home provides all of these and without the presence of their natural predators.

Ants

Widely recognized as the top nuisance pest in America, ants are likely to make an appearance in many homes around Florida this summer. The common myth that seeing one ant indoors equals a full-blown infestation is not necessarily true. However, ants do cooperate by leaving an invisible chemical trail (pheromones) for other ants to follow once they locate a promising food source. If that food source is in your home, you can count on ant colonies developing. They can enter your home through the smallest cracks and invade your kitchen and your pantry. While most ants are considered a harmless nuisance, there are those that pose a serious threat to your family’s health and property. Carpenter ants can cause severe property damage as they tunnel through wood to build nests. The highly invasive crazy ant, can infest homes, recreational vehicles, and any laptop or smart phone left in its path. If you have an ant infestation, vacuum trails of ants, wipe them with soapy water, or spray with window cleaner. Locate entry points then caulk openings or plug with petroleum jelly. Put out bait stations or apply gel bait at entry points. Baits take time to work, so continue to clean up trails. If possible, identify the species of ant for more targeted control of the problem. Always call a professional for a targeted expert removal protocol.

Mosquitoes, Termites, and Other Pests

Interior activity will probably be focused around the kitchen and bathrooms, or near any possible water source. If the bugs are swarming inside of your home, you could have an infestation problem. Limiting access for household bugs is the best way to prevent an infestation. Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home including entry points for utilities and pipes. Keep tree branches and shrubbery well trimmed and away from the house. Keep basements, attics, and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry. Store garbage in sealed containers and dispose of it regularly. Replace weather-stripping and repair loose mortar around basement foundation and windows. Store fire wood at least 20 feet away from the house and five inches off the ground. Call Truly Nolen or Ask our Pest Expert for additional advice on control and treatment. Make sure your Florida Home is Truly Protected this summer!

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Truly Nolen of Palm Coast & St. Augustine Open for Pest Season

Company announces new independently-owned franchise serving Palm Coast and St. Augustine.

“I’m excited to be able to serve the Palm Coast and St. Augustine community as part of the Truly Nolen team. This is where I would come every year for my anniversary and to be able to live and serve in this community gives me great satisfaction.”

tntstaPalm Coast, FL (PRWEB) May 07, 2014

Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, is pleased to announce the May 7th grand opening of its newest independently owned and operated franchise, covering Palm Coast and St. Augustine. Franchise owners and operators, Dean and Tangela Eddy, bring with them several years of experience as successful business owners of a small pizzeria turned restaurant and further experience as real estate contractors.

Mr. Eddy first joined the pest control industry in October 2012 as a pest control technician in Truly Nolen’s Commercial Dept at the Orlando branch. The Eddy’s thorough understanding of operating a business and the pest control industry is a winning combination for this new franchise.

The Eddy’s also bring a unique and heartfelt story behind the opening of their franchise. After working with Truly Nolen for a little less than a year, Mr. Eddy had to have minor surgery. The surgery ended up several hours long resulting in complications and Mr. Eddy was unable to work for four and a half months. Mrs. Eddy explained, “Most employers would not have held the job for an employee that had been with the company for less than a year, but his boss, Jason Dixon, not only held the job for him but called to ask about him.”

Mr. Eddy adds, “Working for a company that treats you like family is rare.” The Eddy’s are proud to be part of the Truly Nolen family.

Mr. Eddy also takes pride in supporting the local community. “I’m excited to be able to serve the Palm Coast and St. Augustine community as part of the Truly Nolen team,” said Mr. Eddy. “This is where I would come every year for my anniversary and to be able to live and serve in this community gives me great satisfaction.”

Truly Nolen Palm Coast/St. Augustine offers residential and commercial pest services for ants, bed bugs, bees and wasps, mosquitoes, rodents, spiders, and more. This includes Truly Nolen’s famous Four Seasons Program that addresses seasonal pest changes. “We’re thrilled to have expanded into Flagler County and part of St. Johns County,” said Vice President of Domestic Franchising, Ron Desear. “All of our services, including the Four Seasons Pest Control Program, are perfect for the community.”

With more than 1,000 employees nationwide and over 75 years of experience, Truly Nolen celebrates the opening of the Palm Coast/St. Augustine franchise. To contact the branch, please call (386) 246-4080 or visit http://www.trulynolenpalmcoast.com.

About Truly Nolen

Founded in 1938, Tucson, Arizona-based Truly Nolen of America is the largest family-owned pest control company in the United States. Recognized with the Super Service Award consecutively for three years for maintaining superior service ratings and reviews on Angie’s List, Truly Nolen builds great relationships and meets the needs of residential and commercial customers. The company has more than 80 corporate branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah and grosses over $100 million in revenue in the US. Truly Nolen also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of states and territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, and Puerto Rico, totaling 57 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.TrulyNolen.com.

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Truly Nolen of Tallahassee Open for Bug Season

Company announces new independently-owned franchise serving Florida’s capital.

“Keeping Leon County homes pest-free with their family and safety in mind is my priority.”

tntal1Tallahassee, FL (PRWEB) April 23, 2014

Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, is pleased to announce the April 24th grand opening of their first independently-owned and operated franchise in Tallahassee, covering the Florida state capital. Franchise owner and operator James Hegler will lead the new franchise, bringing with him a decade of experience in the local construction industry.

His thorough understanding of home and business renovations, including termite repair work, provides him with a solid understanding of Floridian homes and the best ways to keep them pest-free. Mr. Hegler’s knowledge and experience together with the extensive training provided at Truly Nolen corporate is a winning combination for a new franchise.

“I’m excited to be able to serve the Tallahassee community as part of the Truly Nolen team,” said Hegler. “Keeping Leon County homes pest-free with their family and safety in mind is my priority.”

Truly Nolen Tallahassee will offer pest, termite, rodent, mosquito, bee and wasp, and bed bug services for homes and businesses in all of Leon County. This includes Truly Nolen’s famous Four Seasons Program that addresses seasonal pest changes. “We’re thrilled to have expanded into Florida’s state capital,” said Vice President of Domestic Franchising Ron Desear. “All of our services, including the Four Seasons Pest Control Program, are perfect for Tallahassee’s climate.”

As an added bonus, the Truly Nolen limo – complete with mouse ears, whiskers and all – will be traveling throughout the Tallahassee area Memorial Day weekend. So keep your eyes open May 23-26 for the mouse limo!

With more than 1,000 employees nationwide and branches in 58 countries, Truly Nolen celebrates the opening of its first branch in the Florida state capital. To contact the Tallahassee branch, please call (850) 765-4496 or visit http://www.trulynolentallahassee.com.

About Truly Nolen

Founded in 1938, Tucson, Arizona-based Truly Nolen of America is the largest family-owned pest control company in the United States. Truly Nolen has more than 80 corporate branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of states and territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, and Puerto Rico, totaling 58 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.TrulyNolen.com.

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Keeping Mosquitoes in Check

keep-mosquito2

They say April showers bring May flowers, but there’s something else all of that water brings — mosquitoes. These bloodsucking insects are known for an annoying bite that itches and causes a small rash. Mosquitoes are disease-carrying insects that can spread the potentially deadly West Nile Virus and other illnesses.

Residents in most states should expect to see a large surge in mosquito activity in the coming months. Truly Nolen is already experiencing increased calls from around the country from residents, offices, and restaurants experiencing problems with mosquitoes.

Mosquito Repellants Are Not the Answer

For people who are frequently plagued by mosquito bites, bug sprays and candles containing chemical repellants may seem like the perfect solution to keep these insects in check. Unfortunately the chemical in these repellants — DEET — does not actually make mosquitoes leave the area. Instead the chemical is designed to block the mosquito’s ability to smell humans and therefore prevent them from landing on someone to bite and feed. While chemical repellants may save you from the occasional mosquito bite, they do nothing to address where the mosquitoes are coming from, causing you to spend more money in mosquito repellant products without really addressing the source of the problem.

Preventing an Invasion

A mosquito will spend most of its weeklong life near a favorable water source, which provides it food and favorable conditions to mature. Fountains, troughs, buckets, birdbaths, and ponds with standing water all provide female mosquitoes the perfect place for their eggs to grow. Removing these sources of standing water removes the potential for more mosquitoes to breed.

Once you’ve emptied some of these mosquito-spawning areas, it’s up to you to ensure standing water does not accumulate around your home. An effective mosquito prevention regimen also requires consistent landscaping, as mosquitoes enjoy hiding in tall grass, weeds, and other vegetation.

Keeping mosquitoes away from your home is extremely difficult and time-consuming and can keep you from enjoying all of the benefits of summertime. Instead a mosquito control program, like Truly Nolen’s Four Seasons pest control approach, can protect all areas of your home from all kinds of pests, especially the extremely annoying mosquito.

If your summer calendar is beginning to fill up fast, it’s important to ensure your home is protected from these voracious pests and the illnesses they can cause. A free pest inspection provided by a Truly Nolen technician can identify areas where female mosquitoes are likely to lay eggs.

If you’ve had to smack a few mosquitoes off in the past few weeks or are looking to avoid a potential infestation around your home, calling Truly Nolen can help you spend less time worrying about unwanted pests and more time enjoying the outdoors.

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Truly Nolen of America Announces West Palm Beach Branch Manager Promotion

mousecarTruly Nolen of America, Inc., the largest family-owned pest control company in the United States, is pleased to announce the promotion of Arthur Pegler to branch manager of the company’s West Palm Beach branch.

Having begun the manager-in-training program in July, Arthur “Art” Pegler has more than 29 years of experience in the pest control industry, adding great educational value and experience to the branch located in Greenacres. Pegler began his career as a fumigator working his way up to service manager and collecting the knowledge he has today to rid the Palm Beach area of pests.

Effective immediately, Pegler will monitor and evaluate administrative staff and technicians, as well as handle day-to-day operations for his branch.

“Art’s excellent work ethic and experience is a perfect fit for our West Palm Beach branch,” said Mervin Robinson, district manager for the South Florida area. “We’re looking forward to him becoming an outstanding leader in helping us further Truly Nolen’s presence in this market.”

The company, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, is represented in 58 countries with a total of 272 branches including commercial, franchise and corporate branches.

To reach the West Palm Beach branch, please visit or call 561-641-8161.

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Truly Nolen Joins the Fountain Hills Community

Company announces new branch in this tight-knit suburb outside Scottsdale

Truly Nolen Joins the Fountain Hills CommunityWHAT: Fountain Hills residents, rejoice! Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, is moving in. With the support of the Fountain Hills Chamber of Commerce, the new branch will be celebrating their opening with a ribbon cutting on Tuesday, October 15 at 5 p.m. where guests can enjoy networking with food and prize giveaways.

“We’re so excited to expand our presence in the Fountain Hills community,” said Branch Manager Shawnacee Neziol. “Our Truly customer-centric service will bring consistency and knowledge to the close-knit community of Fountain Hills.”

In honor of the opening, Truly Nolen Sales Inspector and local resident Mike Densford is running a promotion to serve the community: every customer will receive $25 off a new annual agreement and 10% off select services such as termite and rodent control. In addition, Truly Nolen will donate $25 to the new customer’s choice of non-profit organization – the Fountain Hills Theatre, the Fountain Hills Botanical Garden, the Boys and Girls Club of Fountain Hills, or the Fountain Hills Library.

Truly Nolen has more than 80 corporate branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah and grosses over $100 million in revenue in the US. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of states and territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, and Puerto Rico, totaling 58 countries.

WHO: Branch Manager Shawnacee Neziol + the Truly Nolen Fountain Hills Team

WHEN:Tuesday, October 15 at 5 p.m.

WHERE:11881 North Saguaro Boulevard, Suite 2
Fountain Hills, AZ 85268

MEDIA CONTACT: Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR
561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

Wendy Shauben, Tilson PR
561-310-0043
wschauben@tilsonpr.com

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Watch Your Step for Scorpions Frightening Pest may be Southwest’s Public Enemy No. 1

Arizona_Bark_ScorpionOne of the most infamous of pests, the scorpion is one of the most difficult to eliminate. They spend most of their time tucked away in cracks or crevices and are even found in children’s sand boxes. Although scorpions are not aggressive hunters, their sting can be quite painful – and in the case of one species found in the U.S., it can sometimes be fatal. The most venomous scorpion in North America, Centriroides exilicauda, is commonly referred to as the Arizona bark scorpion. As one of the smaller species of scorpion, an adult male can grow up to eight centimeters long, yellow to yellow-brown in color, with a long slender tail. It is found throughout the desert Southwest including Arizona (where it was first discovered in Tempe in 1927), western New Mexico, northern Mexico, and the west bank of the Colorado River in California.

Altogether, more than 30 species of scorpions are found in the southern and western United States, including scorpions common to New Mexicans such as the striped scorpion and the Desert Hairy scorpion. While these non-threatening species can inflict a painful sting, serums are available to relieve the more severe symptoms.
Because scorpions normally move about on the tips of their eight legs, with their bodies seldom touching the surface, they are among the most difficult of pests to control,. As a result, many pesticides are not as effective, since most common pesticides depend on physical contact with the animal’s body. One effective way to eliminate them is to remove their food supply, but it can take time for that approach to work.

Scorpions feed on insects, so effective scorpion control is dependent on a more complete pest control program. Since they can survive for weeks without food, and will resort to cannibalism when there is no other source, one of the most effective ways to eliminate scorpions is to physically remove them, one by one, usually at night when they are active. Fortunately, their bodies glow under a black light, so they are relatively easy to spot in the dark.

By the time you see scorpions in the open, you probably already have a serious infestation. For that reason, homeowners should be alert to more subtle signs of scorpions, which can include the sudden, unexplained disappearance of other insects, or finding insect body parts piled neatly in remote corners.
Most of all, be advised that scorpions are sedentary and prefer the most humid available locations. Being aware of areas conducive to a scorpion infestation is also important in preventing them from getting comfortable. Such areas include:

  • Under Garbage cans

  • Organic matter in and around gardens and plant pots

  • Under and around rock beds

  • Untrimmed palm trees, since the fronds collect moisture and other insects

  • Old lumber or bricks

  • Decaying debris such as leaves or bark

  • Stored boxes

  • Water meter / irrigation boxes

  • Wall voids and conduits

  • Insect infested areas such as attics

About Scott Svenheim and Truly Nolen

Scott Svenheim, an expert for Truly Nolen of America and Associate Certified Entomologist, has 27 years of experience in the pest control industry. Scott brings an informative as well as unique and entertaining perspective to consumers’ pest problems in the 21st century. Founded in 1938, Tucson, Arizona-based Truly Nolen of America is the largest family owned pest control company in the United States. Truly Nolen has over 80 branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, Puerto Rico and 55 countries. For more information, please visit www.trulynolen.com.

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Truly Nolen of Las Cruces ‘Cuts the Cheese’

Company Announces Expanding Services to Las Cruces

mousecarWHAT: Las Cruces residents now have nothing to fear when it comes to pests. Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, will be ‘cutting the cheese’ as they welcome the addition of Las Cruces to their service area with a ribbon cutting Thursday, September 12.

“The entire team is looking forward to servicing the area with Truly advanced techniques and care,” said Omar Martinez, Truly Nolen branch manager. “We can’t wait to show the people of Las Cruces the quality of pest control Truly Nolen has to offer and let them know we’re here for them.”

At the company’s ribbon cutting, attendees can enjoy a mix and mingle, food and music, as well as giveaways from gift cards to a flat screen TV.

The company, which is celebrating 75 years of business this year, has more than 14 employees throughout the state of New Mexico and more than 1,000 employees nationwide. Areas now being serviced also include Anthony, Mesquite and Vado.

WHO: Omar Martinez + Las Cruces Truly Nolen Team

WHEN:Thursday, September 12 at 5:00 p.m.

WHERE:Las Cruces Home Builders Hall
2825 N. Main Street
Las Cruces, N.M. 88001

MEDIA CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Scott, please contact Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR.
561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

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St. Petersburg Roof Collapse Caused by Termites

Subterranean termites take a big bite out of local homes

st-petersburge-termiteWHAT: The above photo taken last week depicts exactly what happens when a colony of subterranean termites makes a home out of your house. As roofs collapse, subterranean termites are creating havoc in other homes unbeknownst to their owners.

Why have subterranean termites arrived months ahead of schedule? And what can homeowners do to prepare and prevent?

Jeffery McChesney of Truly Nolen saw a 30 percent increase of these silent destroyers last winter and predicts this year to be even worse. The increase in rain has allowed soil to get saturated, creating the perfect moist conditions for termites to thrive.

Available for interviews upon request, Jeffery has these tips (and more):

  • Eliminate or reduce moisture in and around your home.
  • Maintain at least an 18-inch gap between your home and soil.
  • Trim hedges and other vegetation to prevent ventilation blockages.

WHERE: St. Petersburg area.

WHO: Scott Brody

WHEN: Subterranean termites swarming now, months earlier than normal.

WHY: Subterranean termites swarming now, months earlier than normal.

  • Termite damage is rarely covered by home insurance.
  • Subterranean termites are the most destructive species of termite.
  • An estimated $5 billion in termite-related property damage occurs every year in America.

CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Jeffrey, please contact Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR at 561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

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